39 Comments

  1. lolshatter
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Site selection in the tropics is based on the plant. Cacao can't be grown in full sun and needs a lot of winter protection. Mangos won't fruit in soil too rich in nitrogen. Avocados need partial shade until their leaves completely block out sunlight to the interior of the tree or else the branches will die from sunburn. Jaboticabas require constantly moist highly acidic soil to grow well et cetera

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  2. Monica Tomaras
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    It is so nice to find a gardening channel from a northern gardener. I am in Edmonton so I understand the challenges. I am planning to make my raised garden beds and planning it now. Should i remove the grass beneath my raised beds if i am placing cardboard on the bottom? I have read the worms will eat the grass as well as break down the cardboard and newspaper. Also, you refer to a soil less potting mix, what does that consist of? Your channel is excellent, thank you so much.

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  3. kayla smith
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    how do you keep the wood from rotting? maybe copper tubs are better?

    Reply

  4. Debra Zaragoza
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I'm just now finding your very thorough videos! I'm planning to do raised gardens in Northern Arizona (it actually snows here!) These are great, and I'm subscribing. Thank you!

    Reply

  5. baynerw
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thank you very much for the video!! I have been watching many of them on gardening as my new work schedule allows me to resume gardening after a 2 year hiatus. I like OYR's video's very much as well (post below). Question….peat moss, you made no mention of it. I do have some compost in a plastic "barrel", perhaps 9 to 11 cubic feet of what I think is quality stuff… food scraps, eggshells, grass clippings and fall leaf material 3 years old…it is full of worms surprisingly enough. I plan on keeping half of the ground level garden I currently have and building raised beds in a sort of landscape way so I can add flagstone between them. Back to the peat moss….any recommendations on layering and/or mixing peat, wood ash with compost and rich topsoil? I presume different plants might appreciate the peat. I plan on 12" raised beds in Northern most Indiana. I will ask OYR as well. Thank you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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  6. Miss K
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Would it be ok to plant flowers in a raised planter? If so what would be the ideal or the minimum depth of the planter?

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  7. Tay Klein
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thank you for this very useful video! I have never thought of using cardboards on the bottom of a raised bed, but I like the idea, since I have many of them. But will water go through cardboards nicely?

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  8. Terra
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thanks so much for the information on raised gardens!

    Reply

  9. deon webb
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Hello I live in Southern California I’ve built my raised garden bed and bought compost 70/30 ( sand wood chips and soil) when I’m transplanting do I need to add fertilizer? I’m a beginner 😀

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  10. Amethist86
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    This is really helpfull!

    Reply

  11. anne drew potter
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    We have a difficult space to work with light wise, a small area between our house and our garage, so only the first 4 feet from the house get consistent summer sunlight. To increase our space, I'm planning to put some raised beds on part of our driveway and am considering locations. I have three options: along the neighbouring fence will give morning direct sun from about 9 or 10 to about 3 or 4, but then becomes shaded by the neighbours house. Alongside our garage which will get afternoon sun – from about 2 until sunset. Or I can put a strip down the middle of our driveway (which is 2 cars wide), which should get all day sun but will just be surrounded by driveway and alley, getting dust from anyone driving by. Any thoughts out there?

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  12. Tooth Fairy
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I wonder whether you can build a raised bed garden that is completely cut off to the corrupted (salty in my case) soil underneath.

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  13. Cristal Alameda
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    that's a cute pupper

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  14. Bethany Thornburg
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Hey! Question.. so the soil in my backyard is utter rubbish, full of rocks, and I'm not really sure how many earthworms are actually back there.. I don't think I've ever seen one. I know earthworms are essential in the aeration of the soil that would be in my bed, so I'm wondering should I add earthworms myself or will they be naturally attracted to the healthy soil in my beds despite the actual backyard being so crappy? Or should I supplement in extra coconut coir, which I've read helps tremendously with aeration? I'm completely new to this! Thank you!!

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  15. Joshua Ehl
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Good for you on reusing word sources.

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  16. Sonja Toutenhoofd
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    hmmm…I had fill dirt (the guy said it was fine for garden beds) put in two new boxes we made with his help. I now regret it as the dirt seems sandy and lifeless. I guess I should dig it out and replace with better soil, do you think? I did mix in some of my nice compost but not enough. Maybe I should buy some bags of soil from the hardware store to replace? If you still follow this, what do you recommend?

    Reply

  17. sikamikan
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    great content in this video. thanks for sharing

    Reply

  18. Hobby Homesteader
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I want to have my very first gardening season. I am in AZ so the must love the heat …. I want to use a series of raised bed and am looking for beds I don't actually have to build. I have heard horse troughs or baby pools work … any thought?

    Reply

  19. Jen K
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I do not use pine as it is acidic and changes the pH in the soil. Most plants are neutral pH therefore, changing the balance in the soil can cause problems, unless you are using plants that are grown best in acidic soil. Using cedar is great for use in gardens especially on the coast or rainy regions as it is more rot resistant in the rain.

    Reply

  20. MARÍA
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    thanks for the video I have a question I want to build one of these garden boxes butt I live in West Texas oil field and the dirt here is very contaminated I want to plant vegetables I've never Garden before thank you where can I get good seeds that don't have any nasty crap in them if anyone knows no (GMOs)

    Reply

  21. suDz
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Great video for the starters !!

    Can't we just use compost/vermicompost plus fine top soil(instead of potting soil), which may or may not have nutrients in it ??

    Reply

  22. Latoya Williams
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    So distracted by the cute puppy lol.

    Reply

  23. Joshua Deaver
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Great video! I am new to this hobby and I have a rock yard. If I am looking to do a raised bed, do I need to remove all rocks down to the dirt or can I build directly on top of the rocks?

    Reply

  24. Edward burdick
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I am finding a lot of white hairs in my raised bed. Will they hurt my planting seeds?

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  25. Goon Dawg
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I'm a new Gardner..
    Here's my question. I've built a 18 ft by 4 ft raised garden. I live in a big city and the raised garden concept I think will work for me.
    What kind of soil can I use?
    It's 14" high so how much soil do I put in it?

    Reply

  26. John Holloway
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    So, instead of using cardboard to kill the grass below, you can use newspaper—say several sheets thick (black and white only, no colors?)??
    Thanks

    Reply

  27. Jalynne Fuentes
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Good video and cute puppy! Keep on posting!

    Reply

  28. Haley Mansfield
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thank you so much! This is a concise video with a lot of practical information for an extreme newbie like me! Now I just need to figure out a plan for where to plant all of my different seeds!

    Reply

  29. The McNamara Family Channel
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    awesome video, thank you!

    Reply

  30. Sean Monts
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Excellent!!

    Reply

  31. Munib Buhić
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    My father told me I had to visit Simply Love Gardening (search on Google). I learned a lot there.

    Reply

  32. James Tepfenhart
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    At the end of the year, do you remove the dirt from the garden bed. Or do you just add oppose to your garden after the first year.

    Reply

  33. Camelia Burjan
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    the little dog stole your show :)))

    Reply

  34. Practical Readiness
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thanks for the video! I'm just getting started with raised bed gardening and enjoying the challenge.

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  35. Wise Student
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Thankyou,  But is a raised bed really worth all the cost ????

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  36. Wise Student
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Every body has all kinds of ideas for design, materials, size, for raised bed gardening…..But No body tells where to get the planting material (dirt) for a raised bed….

    Reply

  37. pookergirl
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    You make no mention of being sure not to use treated wood!  The chemicals will leach into your soil!

    Reply

  38. Michael Clark
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    Raised beds are great for people with limited space, maximum yield in a minimal area and beginners can get excellent results from even a small raised bed.

    Reply

  39. parmz1
    August 31, 2019 @ 11:55 pm

    I like your dog.

    Reply

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