31 Comments

  1. Anna at the Farm
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I bought the book years ago, still use the info to this day. Made 1 bed a month ago, planted tomatoes & they are flowering now.

    Reply

  2. J
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I highly recommend searching Morag Gamble No Dig Garden method. great vid on this method and clearly explained! check it out

    Reply

  3. Aime Bouchard
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    i did a lasagna layered garden only six inches deep and it grew everything from beans, beats, tomatoes, peppers and squash just great.

    Reply

  4. Alexandra Huang
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    This is so fascinating. So weeds won't grow over the stuff you laid over the paper and cardboard?

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  5. Linda Fennell
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I have this book, and have used the Lasagna garden method to create many beautiful garden beds this way.

    Reply

  6. Cliff Carr
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Wow……That is the most impressive thing I have ever seen done in a garden. Thank you.

    Reply

  7. Teresa from Oklahoma
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Can this be done over my lawn without digging away top layer?

    Reply

  8. Márizá Epicentro
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I have found that it is useful to put fresh manure under the newspaper layer- it attracts earthworms quicker…

    Reply

  9. Gayle Stegall
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I have been using this method for years. I love it. Oh, and I look for split bags every time I go to the garden center.

    Reply

  10. ANJANYA
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    You girlz r amazin love ur lasagna! Never considered mother nature was an italiana

    Reply

  11. Patricia Ncube
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Verybnice video. Thanks for sharing .

    Reply

  12. Experiment 47
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I love this method☝️. I've been putting 📰newspaper out in my veggie garden for years and when the crops come up in the Spring and Fall they have the most lovely hint of ink flavor 👌. Helpful hint for first-timers: use 🗞️newspapers that contain soybean ink pigmented with Prussian Blue and Cadmium Yellow — because blue and yellow make green 💯!

    Reply

  13. Yvonne Davis
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Ms Pat was amazing.,,🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗🤗

    Reply

  14. V 13
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    This is great ladies! I was thinking it would be nice to put organic somewhere in your title. because it would be nice to know you are Earth friendly people at the beginning. I really like this video! Thank you for the great tips! 🌻

    Reply

  15. Sharon Sampson
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    "It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble…
    It's what you know for sure that just ain't so."
    — Mark Twain.

    Reply

  16. Alison Self
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    This is a great idea! I can't wait to try this!

    Reply

  17. Janette Lavender
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Bravo. This works fabulous. Ive done this four years and its worked for everything Ive planted. I would never use peat moss though. Please read up on the ill effects and damage to the locations peat is sourced from. Its not necessary for this project anyway. Great video!

    Reply

  18. Sharon Sampson
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    http://mastergardener.wsu.edu/ Please people this is where you get SOLID gardening basics that frickin' work…master gardener program. You don't have to do a decade of University Botany, Landscape Architecture….to know the basics. The basics are not being taught on this internet by any of these wannabee gardeners. All of these fads would be DUMPED once someone just learns the basics!? THEN perhaps we can elevate the knowledge base of gardening on the internet.

    Reply

  19. Sharon Sampson
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Composting anaerobically is a big no no if you aren't knowing what you are doing. Raw scraps at the bottom of a plant's hole DOES ABSOLUTELY NOTHING for the plant, for the soil organisms and even not the aerobic decomposers…this new fad is simply bogus and worse than all these other fads in gardening. Sorry, I know this stuff and I am surprised that none of my contemporaries are NOT correcting these blatant lame 'experiments' and new FADS for growing plants. Unbelievable. If you have at least a master gardener certification, hell, you wouldn't be promoting these fads, not one bit. If there is a Master Gardener (someone taught by a University Cooperative Extension Service) involved, no WAY would these fads get promoted…by a Master Gardener. Forget 8 years of botany, biology, chemistry, hydrology, entomology, physics…yadayadayada and 50 years of hands on residential and commercial gardening, designing, installation, building custom homes…massive successful vegetable gardens as well!

    I HATE being the bad guy, the party pooper. But I love making gardeners by making people successful growing any plant! This is just wrong and wronger. Go check it out or learn the hard way?

    Reply

  20. Sharon Sampson
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Please tell people to get a soil test FIRST! Adding anything to the soil or your gardens without a reason without a soil test is simply nuts. All of the work to make a lasagna BED in this video is a waste of time and energy. Sorry, I have to say something, I guess I get to be the major party pooper. Spending that energy on what works and what will make one successful is way more fun and profitable.

    Plants don't die and think about going to heaven.

    I wouldn't show this video to kindergarten kids! Please go to you Universities Cooperative Extension Service and learn the BASICS. Get comfortable with chemistry, soils, botany, biology, entomology, hydrology, composition processes…then if you learn the basics then combine what you are doing and THEN teach. Otherwise, YOU confusing others and making frustrated gardeners.

    Tell your viewers HOW decomposition works; what animals and plants are involved.

    Reply

  21. Sharon Sampson
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Lasagna gardening came from 'Lasagna composting'. Composting is a separate gig in gardening and should be kept separate. Transferring Lasagna composting to growing plants is ridiculous. Cardboard? Have you guys had ANY soil science at all?

    Reply

  22. around the house with cheryl
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Awesome!

    Reply

  23. Jeff Boelter
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Great advice, "Now" is the right time.

    Reply

  24. Carrie Haddican
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I live in a desert, no grass or leaves. So what should I use for lasagna layers?

    Reply

  25. agnes e. mililani mau kiesling
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Really enjoyed your garden!! Lasagna gardening!! Makes so much sense!! 😅

    Reply

  26. Rita Beitz
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Lasagna gardening is just another form of "no till" gardening! So so many people are realizing that this method including many others, like wood chips, straw, leaves, etc just all turn into dirt eventually making for a rich naturally composted soil. This video is also in the south, where it is very warm. So make sure that it is the right time of year where you are as tomatoes and peppers need very warm weather to survive. Also each kind of plant has different PH requirements. After a year or so when everything has composted naturally, you should test your soil for the proper PH. Then if it is either too acidic or too alkaline, you can top dress with lime or chicken manure to better suit what you are planting. No till is the way to go and it makes for a rich, nutrient rich soil. Thanks to you gals for showing that anyone can do it!

    Reply

  27. Shandi
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Can you do this with perennials?

    Reply

  28. Jeannie
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    I have used this method many many times with superior results!!

    Reply

  29. Michele LaMas-Somerville
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Should you be handling lime without gloves?

    Reply

  30. The bible girl
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Very ladies yes always we can learn.

    Reply

  31. Pennie Newman
    August 1, 2019 @ 12:32 pm

    Seems you would want to be careful about picking up neighbors clippings on the curb unless you know if their lawn had been treated with anything.

    Reply

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