29 Comments

  1. Tuck
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    put the space heater on a cinder block to prevent it from getting wet and shorting out.

    Reply

  2. rkwill100
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    you have 'shore' power. So obtain a electric heat 'blanket' for each holding tank. (available at most RV outlets) DON'T place electric heaters under your RV. Any moisture (like running water on the ground) can short them, possibly causing a fire. Use insulation over heat tape (including where the water hose enters the RV and the source stand pipe).

    Reply

  3. kg kb
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Your a idiot

    Reply

  4. Mark P
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    LOOKS like a sail,first wind comes and BLOWS all that Styrofoam away!!

    Reply

  5. B Laviolette
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    You're using a space heater under the RV, where it could get wet and outside of your view. Sounds like a recipe for a fire to me.

    Reply

  6. Shawn/IO
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Ok so all you need to do is buy 600 dollars of foam insulation lol yeah don't spend half of that on a wood stove that would be too smart

    Reply

  7. charlie123866
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    spray foam the tanks up to the valves..

    Reply

  8. Laura Wofford-Brown
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    How to winterize. Go south ! LOL

    Reply

  9. LovingAtlanta
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    👍Very helpful info & tips. 💞

    Reply

  10. terry waller
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    You can buy an adapter to let you switch between the internal propane tank and an external portable tank.

    Reply

  11. Terry L
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    My family owns an insulation contractor. Wrapping the pipes inside a heated space actually keeps the pies from being heated. By the warm air inside your coach. You are in effect not allowing the pipes to stay warm and remain the same temp as your coach. The rule is to insulate behind the pipes if you insulate at all to keep cold air intrusion from blowing on your pipes. In a cold space like an attic full pipe wrap on pipes is cool. In a heated space I would not. Thanks.
    D

    Reply

  12. MJ Morrow
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Gone with the Wynns has some great content for RV'ers and anyone thinking about buying a Catamaran and reading to the seas 🙂

    Reply

  13. ltyr2001 1
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    These are very good, and you are a smart guy!
    Well done!

    Reply

  14. preacher031163
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    to answer ur que stion on insulating the lines…it is far easier just to use heat tape,or better yet,run new pecs lines in the heating ducts…i live in mine full time in montana and have no issues…..if u have questions ive probly done it…now that i found a park to winter in i skirted with 1.5 inch foam insulation,placed 1 electric heater underneathe the coach blowing where the water tank is…..maintains 50even when its below 0…

    Reply

  15. preacher031163
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    just so u know even if u have frost free hook ups it will freeze…and u will burst the hosts underground lines….do as u did…fill it and unhook

    Reply

  16. Bill Callahan
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Thanks just starting out. God bless. May your journeys be joyous and fruitful. Not traveling. Just a place I can feel at ease. Rest my bones.
    Thanks again

    Reply

  17. Gene Kizhner
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Here's a friendly advice from hardy Canadians spending harsh winters in RV's at oil and gas sites throughout northern BC and Alberta:

    1) To winterize your windows, use special bubble wrap with flat surfaces on both sides (not the regular one with bare bubbles sticking out on one side) and attach it really tightly to the window glass while also covering metal frames surrounding it all the way to the wood trim. Keep it in place by running scotch tape all the way around it sealing it as best as you can. There's also bubble wrap with one sticky side which is absolutely ideal for that: it doesn't leave much air between the wrap and the glass/metal frame, thus eliminating condensation and frost. This material is also great in letting the sunlight in during the day (unlike reflectix/astrofoil) while providing good privacy at night (you can only see people's silhouettes inside even with blinds open). It's fairly easy to peel off in spring, but you might need to use a bit of rubbing alcohol to remove any adhesive residue from the glass.

    2) You can also attach pieces of bubble wrap to the vent and skylight openings to let the light in without loosing the heat. I recommend keeping them in place using self-adhesive velcro strips attached around the perimeter of both the opening and the bubble wrap cover – that way they're easy to remove when needed.

    3) Glue a large sheet of sticky bubble wrap over the top of your bed board under the matress to reduce condensation there.

    4) To insulate the walls and roof use penoplene (look up either that word or 'foamed polyethylene'). This is a fairly cheap but amazing material very popular in Europe and sold on amazon/ebay in form of soft and flexible 1/4''-thick tiles with one self-adhesive side and another having various 3D decorative patterns and colors (some really nice). You simply glue them onto your internal walls and ceiling like you would regular tiles, and they boost your rig's insulation immensely. They are also fairly easy to peel off and/or replace with a different design when the old one feels too old.

    5) Use self-adhesive astrofoil with one sticky side to insulate the walls inside all the cabinets (top and bottom) as well as all the basement storage compartments (including the inside of all storage hatches). Check the condition and sealing quality of the hatch seals (especially in an old RV) and replace it or beef it up using residential self-adhesive door insulation strips if necessary.

    6) Use penoplene to cover the inside of your rig's entrance door, and put sticky bubble wrap on the door window.

    7) To insulate the floor, you can use thick carpet or area rugs, but nothing beats 2''-thick interlocking closed-cell floor tiles sold in any hardware store (some sport equipment stores also have them under the name 'tatami mats'). They're also super comfy to walk on.

    WORD OF CAUTION: Generally speaking, any extra insulation layers you put inside your rig MUST be attached to your rig's walls/windows/ceiling/floor tightly with minimal air gap (and not just covering loosely or being simply hang on the wall), otherwise the gap will fill up with condensate which will ruin your rig. Condensation and frosting around window sills are the main reason why all these other ideas like closing the shades or covering the windows with astrofoil or blankets just don’t work, not to mention they will turn your rig into a depressing everdark cave.

    8) The biggest sources of heat loss (especially in the newer, better insulated 4-season RV's) are the slideout perimeter seals. Buy thick self-adhesive door seal strips (or cut 2"-wide strips from thick and soft closed-cell foam mats sold in hardware stores or on ebay) and glue them around the perimeter of the slideout behind the decorative wood trim where it connects with the external slideout walls so that when the slide is fully out these foam strips will be somewhat compressed against the internal wall providing a good seal. Unfortunately, this cannot be done at the bottom of the slide, so you have to identify the main routes of draft penetration on some cold windy day and improvise the ways to block them.

    9) Avoid using propane heaters (unlike propane furnace or electric fireplace, they produce a lot of moisture).

    10) To further reduce moisture, use microwave or electric toaster to cook/reheat your food instead of propane cooktop or stove, and if you absolutely must boil or cook something using propane then turn on the exhaust fan or crack your roof vent open to drive away the vapours.

    11) Be very careful with electric heaters of any kind (even oil radiators – they can also cause fire if they trip).

    12) Avoid showering in your rig as much as possible (use a workplace, gym or campsite shower).

    13) Avoid drying loundry, wet clothes or sports gear inside your rig on really cold days when you can't air it.

    14) Buy a good dehumidifier if you cannot reduce moisture by the above steps – it's well worth it. Remember: excessive moisture in the rig breeds mold and mildew which will slowly kill not only your rig but also its occupants, and once it's there it's almost impossible to get rid of.

    15) Watch closely the inlet and outlet vents of your fridge (especially if you ever run it on propane in freezing cold): icicles tend to grow inside the space behind your fridge blocking these vents.

    16) Don't bother clearing snow banks around or under your rig (it's a typical rookie mistake to think that they might accelerate freezing of your tanks and piping). Conversely – as soon as there's enough snowfall, pile as much snow as you can around the rig to attract even more snow in the next snow storm thus growing the snow barrier around your rig untill ideally it will completely close the gap between the bottom of your rig and the ground (this is especially important if you don't have a skirt). Also do not remove snow cover from the top of your rig and slide roofs.

    17) I'd definitely recommend using a heat-traced water hose for hookup. In a modern 4-season rig with heated underbelly and tanks you may not need to keep the water running all the time to prevent the internal pipes from freezing, but I'd recommend to do this in extreme cold or if the park where you're staying doesn't have heated water hookups. If it does, it may be better to use it periodically to fill up your tank and run off of it using your water pump most of the time. In such case, as well as if you're boondocking, I'd also recommend to turn off your water pump and leave all the taps (hot and cold) fully open if you leave your rig without furnace running for any length of time e.g. before going to work or ski. Do this also before going to bed on extremely cold noghts even with furnace running. Do it as often as you can if your rig is not 4-season rated.

    Good luck and keep warm!

    Reply

  18. MoBench25
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Great advices……

    Reply

  19. AJ Hainstock
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Love your videos, just want to give you a couple of great tips for winter RV living from myself, as i full time RV with my wife and 2 kids in an older 97 GMC class A motorhome up in Saskatchewan Canada, and over winter we easily get -45°C (-49F) sometime hitting well below -50°C (-58F) and so far i have NEVER had a water line or tank freeze up,

    I had purchased an electric stick on heating pad, they are designed to be used mostly on vehicle is the freezing temps to stick onto the oil pan, they run anywhere between 100watts to 300watts of power each ranging from like $20 to $100 each, i purchased 4 150watt KATZ(company name) silicon pad heaters, the ones i used are about $40 each.

    I stuck 1 onto each of my black tank and grey tank, and 2 onto my fresh water tank(incase one failed i had a backup for the fresh tank but only actually use 1)

    each one plugged into an extension cord and into an outlet power strip directly into the 20amp service plug at the RV parks power pedestal instead of into one of my RV outlets to ensure i dont accidently over load a circuit inside and trip a breaker.

    Using my infrared thermometer i took a reading of all 3 tanks at -36°C (-33F) and all 3 of the tanks were at +7°C (+45F) water freezes at 0°C or 32°F so theres a good idea at how well the heat pads work,

    Last winter when we got a really cold snap we hit -57°C (-75°F) with the 1 pad heater on the fresh water tank my temp read 1°C (34°f) so i plugged in the other heater pad on it and withing 2 hours raised my water tanks temp up to 6°c (43°f) and i just dumped my black and grey water and put 1 gallon salt water into those 2 waste tanks (1 gallon water, 1 cup salt) just to keep something in the tanks if we had to use the toilet.

    As for my water lines, well mime are all behind the cabinet doors and with 2 small kids and a dog, i didnt want to leave them propped open a couple inches for the heat to flow in, so each one i just cut a 1 inch tall by 6 inch wide slot or air vent in them, but being an older RV it didnt bother me doing so, on a newer one, i probably wouldnt do that, but just an idea.

    Anyways, sorry for the long winded comment, just wanted to share my experience after full timing for 3 years now up north here

    Anyways, ill leave a link to those stick on heat pads in the reply below if your interested in checking them out with winter coming up on us fairly quickly now. (Unless the link ends up in the spam filter, than i apologize)

    Reply

  20. Dana Wilson
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    pour a cup of antifreeze in the toilet 🙂

    Reply

  21. BEVERLEY LYNNE HARRIS
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    May make sense to put a layer of reflectex on the ground under the RV as well, so the crawl space heat isn't absorbed by the ground. Cheers!

    Reply

  22. BEVERLEY LYNNE HARRIS
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    I've also seen incandescent trouble lights placed under crawl spaces with good effect – 100-150 watts each

    Reply

  23. Brian Mombourquette
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Great vid. Here's another one that could be helpful, from the RV Geeks: https://youtu.be/n5RGlcLSrM4

    Reply

  24. alpinehs
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    excellent video. thanks

    Reply

  25. 64maxpower
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    a Halogen work light can work in place of a heater too. or maybe a drop light in the Wet bay can help too

    Reply

  26. Nomad Wizard
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    For under cabinet plumbing do not use the foam on the cold water, just prop 1 cabinet door open 1/2 in and the heat from the 'room' will keep them from freezing

    Reply

  27. SKPjoe Coursegold
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    all great tips, thanks.

    Reply

  28. lukngud
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    Happy Thanksgiving!

    Reply

  29. Bobby Baldeagle
    May 17, 2019 @ 6:06 pm

    I'm here in S/E Wisconsin, Where are you at???

    Reply

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