30 Comments

  1. Dawn Conover
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    We build spec homes. I'm a realtor, and have noticed that people are way too indecisive. I put quality materials in the home, that aren't too expensive, and have great subs to do the work.

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  2. Hicks Chick
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    You are not talking to the average person. The average person is not going to have a decorator.

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  3. Linda Fukuyu
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I must tell you this .. Women in general are indecisive and keep changing mind .. all the time 🙂

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  4. EnhancedNightmare
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I'll add something: legal stuff with the local authorities: water, electricity, plumbing all that has to be done in advance. I knew a family that finished their home and then waited two years for plumbing being connected to their house. Imagine that.

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  5. Walter Gramer
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    As an integrated engineer that's been a project and experiment design lead, this was a fun rant. I see so many parallels… and now I want to build a house 😂

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  6. Vicinity Life
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    My family and I are moving next year and we are getting a pretty big house with 4 bedrooms and 2 baths but we don’t know how to construct it

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  7. Alek Foy
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Amen

    Reply

  8. Anonymous Bagel
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I plan on building a minimalist small house from scratch with my own hands but every video and thread acts like hiring a person is building it yourself

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  9. ReKisha Burton
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Any builder recommendations?

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  10. jessestylex
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    America , so many rules with everything you do.

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  11. TheTread123
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Minimalist building of a new house that itself is a minimalist ie it takes care of itself , no dusting needed ,self evacuating of air when spraying stuff (toxic) or peopel hwo wear heavy petrochemcial based perfumes or colognes, Using water very efficently and purifies down to having a great greenhouse. Pool using the latest water treatment tech,of course non -toxic.

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  12. TheTread123
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I read of a home that was built out in the high desert with no incoming waterline but water was used up to 10 times and the technologies back then were not even close of what exists today. Plus think of all the common elements and also the design tech via computer software . The home would be self sustainable, almost. Plus the outside environment that might be affected by soil moisture would not be affected,

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  13. yamamancha
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    This process Dave described is exactly how our house-building process went. I would add that another piece of paper required is a detailed estimate outlining all parts with serial numbers. This forces you to pick out materials before the project starts and ensures accountability to the budget.

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  14. Jim Kelley
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Show me all the blueprints, show me all the blueprints, show me all the blueprints, show me all the blueprints

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  15. Pete S
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I built my house back in 2000. I did a lot of the work myself. Skipped the contractor and hired subcontractors. I bought and old backhoe to dig a full basement on my 40'x28' two story house. Took me a year to build but only cost $60k for material and labor. The only permits i had to buy was electrical and septic. I built outside the city limits on land I already owned with an old house that i lived in. I sold the old house with 2 acres and recooped most of my money on the new house with it's 8 acres.

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  16. Jon Lenin
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Instead of demolishing a house for plans- why not find a more rural area with a bit more land that is for sale and build right then and there? After the 3 key factors he mentions of course. Rural areas are usually cheaper, no demolishing costs and it's more peaceful and quiet.. Unless of course its about being flashy and showing off your creation.

    Reply

  17. Gil Sd
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Don't like this guy.

    Reply

  18. david kowalkowski
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    not that good, very generic advice.
    the video should be called "how to come in budget and on time when building a home"
    there are really good videos how to smartly build a home, figuring out the sq footage you need, efficient design, figuring out your energy use and how to reduce it, etc.
    also, making a schedule is good but, if there is no flexibility to your schedule you will end up spending a fortune trying to keep on schedule.
    for example if it rained for a week and 2 weeks and no one was able to work. and you go to your builder and ask them "what they will do to get back on schedule" well their are 2 options.
    1. the builder gets allot more guys on site and you pay allot of money to do 3 weeks of work in 1 week, or
    2. you're 2 weeks off schedule and come in on budget
    a specified deadline in building is a luxury and a luxury you pay for.

    Reply

  19. Brenton
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I know this video is a bit old, but I feel I need to say something in defense of the profession you just spit on. Architects of old may have been seriously out of touch with the actual construction process, but today, this isn’t the case at all. I’m about to finish my fourth year of a six year masters degree, and I’ve already had to take, understand, and apply Calculus level math, Physics, five structure’s courses and partake in six group projects involving engineers, construction managers and builders. I’m currently working an internship with a company specifically known for tight budget city projects so as to learn what needs to be done to stay on said budget. Todays architects are truly the master builders of the site. We are expected to know every part of the process from designing the building to functionally work, and look like something you want to pay $200k+ to live in, to making sure the roof goes on correctly and at the appropriate time. A finished building is the architect’s sole responsibility, and it really ticks me off to hear people with stereotypes degrade the profession by saying things like “art school.” I follow your concepts Dave, and I like what you preach, but next time you want to describe someone’s profession, please give credit where credit is due.

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  20. A.J B
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I can't believe I actually got to 7 min, to listen to you nonsens !!!

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  21. pamelam4
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Scope Creep will get you every time. Basic project management.

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  22. Marybeth Eby
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I would love to see inside Daves house!!Awesome castle!

    Reply

  23. chieftp
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    hang on a sec – back up a bit….let's start with – how do you even get a contractor to return a phone call to actually talk to them about building a house? I've been trying to find someone to build me a house for 2 years. contractors must be so busy that they don't need any new jobs. I have a checking account with enough money to pay cash for land and a house and can't find anyone who wants it. money is no longer an incentive to motivate people to work.

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  24. R B
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Spot on advice.

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  25. Derek Kimball
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Can I give one thousand likes? Hit the nail on the head!

    Reply

  26. Anthony Gonzales
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Realtors are nothing, but used car sales people, try to sell you anything. I speak from experience.

    Reply

  27. Isaac Spencer
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Hard part is looking at the actual costs. We build my grandmas house. Materials cost just under $40,000. However with all the hours we put in….it added over $100,000 worth of $ we would have made at our own jobs. So if you have weekends off and have lots of spare time building isn't bad. But when you personally build your own house then you are committed. You can't stop half way.

    Reply

  28. Phillip Barrera
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    Restoring my house after Hurricane Harvey, contractors are a mess! I should have set it up better from the beginning…

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  29. Michael Parker
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    As a construction inspector i dont think i could let someone else build a house for me hands off.

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  30. Ryan Cook
    November 7, 2018 @ 4:55 pm

    I would never build my own home. I seen the stress it put my dad through and there's no way I want to go through that. Granted he did get a beautiful home and sold it after he retired for much more than the cost to build it. I'll have mine paid off in the next couple years and hopefully I never have to move away.

    Reply

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